How Thoughtful Communication Can Empower International Teams | Mercer 2019

How Thoughtful Communication Can Empower International Teams | Mercer 2019

Our Thinking / Career / Voice on Talent

How Thoughtful Communication Can Empower International Teams
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Calendar2019/08/22

What does it take to lead a successful international team? Here are four habits that have helped me effectively lead a globally diverse workforce

Successful teams are often united over a common goal and a shared set of experiences. But, as the workforce becomes more distributed and business travel becomes increasingly burdensome to the bottom line and detrimental to the environment, leaders need to be more creative in developing and fostering positive team dynamics. With fewer face-to-face meetings, how are international leaders coalescing their team?

Here are four habits I have adopted that you should consider in managing international teams:

Habit 1: Remove the Mentality of “You Need to be There”

Technology is, without a doubt, the game changer when it comes to international team effectiveness. Yet, human-led organizations often struggle to accommodate, and leverage the speedy and persistent nature of change brought by digital technologies. There are, of course, times when face-to-face meetings are required; however, Mercer has noticed clients are demonstrating an increasing comfort level with holding seminars, conferences and other traditional in-person interactions via online meeting platforms. Though the virtual workforce trend is nothing new, it has reached an inflection point where clients often prefer to partner with companies that actively internalize the power and practicality of being agile, versatile and virtual.

Today’s transformative Chief Marketing Officers (CMOs) urge their C-suite peers to adopt have this mindset and leverage differentiating new technologies. As managers, marketing leaders will find that their employees and marketing teams are more productive and online more, if allowed to do their work on their own time. People react well to not only managing their work but also having the flexibility to set their own schedules. At Mercer, we have seen our people work with more excitement, passion and collaborative enthusiasm when provided the freedom to excel according to their personal cadences. Let talented people do what they need to do to get stuff done.

Habit 2: Cross-Cultural Communication with International Teams

With the direction set and the team empowered to find their path forward, it’s time to focus on communication. Different cultures, of course, perceive, process and interpret information and context differently. These differences can create communication breakdowns that are extremely costly in terms of time, quality and money. Effective messaging is direct and only refers to limited, but critical, pieces of information that necessitate a particular email, phone call or conversation. Inspiring leaders find their voice and communicate in a way that is simple, memorable and supportive. All correspondences among international teams should be carefully packaged, contained and well thought out.

 

Don’t underestimate the power of repetition. Often, when dealing with team members from multiple cultures and languages, repetition of established goals, processes, timelines and expectations is vital to successful outcomes. Repetition, when done with tact and clear intentions, is not disrespectful or seen as micromanaging. It bolsters the ability of everyone on the team to achieve their goals (honestly, I find repetition extreme helpful. By the time I’m reminded what we’re trying to get done three or four times—especially in a few different ways—it sticks!). When you’re dealing with cross-border teams, never assume that everyone fully understands the strategy and desired results on the first two or three discussions. Using repetition creatively helps the team focus on the north star.

Habit 3: Be Succinct and Culturally Aware

Cultural awareness is learned. It took me a while to appreciate and understand the nuances of each member of my team, not only in their approach to solving problems, but the influence of their culture on their overall outlook. Our research on diversity and inclusion points to the value of ensuring all voices are heard on the team. As a matter of fact, there are a range of products today designed to enable employees to share their perspectives (separate from employee engagement surveys) – and many of these are being tailored for D&I purposes. With international teams, this lesson is particularly punctuated. When team members in Tokyo, Taiwan and Mexico City are all speaking to each other, ensuring they use the same direct, simple and familiar language increases efficiency and the likelihood of success.

Being culturally sensitive and aware is incredibly important. Years ago, I used to feel very concerned if people were not speaking up in marketing meetings, or weren’t instantly on video conferences showing their face, but I realized over time that people need to communicate in ways that makes sense to them. As a leader, I’ve learned that it is my responsibility to respect other people’s learning and working styles and that—if I did that—these individuals would become increasingly more open and trusting of me. Marketing leaders have to earn trust, just like everyone else. It is important to not expect that people to think and act the way you think and act. People come from different perspectives and have different personality types—from introverts to extroverts and everything in between. And that diversity is instrumental to success.

Habit 4: Lead with Genuine Positivity

My favorite habit, is bringing my whole self to work. As leaders, we must make a conscious effort to be encouraging and to find genuine, sincere ways to boost people’s confidence. This takes time and awareness as each person behaves according to varying types of motivations, instructions and sensibilities. As a company, we have to be demanding because we have aggressive goals. However, the most effective and rewarding route to achieving those goals is by making the conscious decision to encourage employees as they execute their responsibilities—especially during challenging times.

Regardless of gender, race or nationality, I think that one overriding universal truth is that people respond more graciously, productively and passionately to authentic positive feedback and encouragement. I know this personally, because I have benefitted from positive reinforcement many times in my career—oftentimes when I needed it the most—from my peers, colleagues and fellow team members. It really helps. In fact, the most successful leaders I know and have worked with are extremely positive people.

Teams and individuals need to be reminded, particularly during tough times, that, yes, they are doing excellent work and they are moving in the right direction. Never underestimate how much a genuine comment like “You’re doing a great job” and “Keep going” can do for someone who feels overwhelmed, underappreciated or unmotivated at a particular moment in their career. Positivity is all about appreciating the time and work employees invest into success and giving them credit for their efforts and accomplishments.